SpaceX

R

[)roi(]

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SpaceX SN15 stuck the landing.
After a 10km flight into the horizontal sky diver style free fall and then flipped back into a vertical orientation to stick the landing.

It was an overcast day so the entire trajectory couldn't be observed, but it followed a similar profile to previous launches, except this time it stuck the landing and that was clearly visible at ground level.

No RUD (Rapid Unscheduled Disassembly) this time. ;)

Next milestones will be to:
  • Further refine the landing and test the concept of rapid reuse.
  • Complete the build of the Starship booster and similarly fly and stick it's landing. First draft was completed last month, they now building the booster for the 1st flight; should be ready in a month or two at most.
  • Then off to orbit, with a return to land using the same manoeuvres as SN15.
Musk's timeline for this is July / August this year... even being sceptical based solely on their build speed; it'll most definitely be before year end. Refinement of Starship and certification for human space flight and onto the moon will probably take 1 to 2 years after their 1st orbital success. Quite possible we'll see equipment launches before human flight (e.g. Starlink).

The moon flight btw also requires in orbit refuelling between two Starships; 1 being a fuel tanker specifically designed for that purpose

The Starship destined for the moon will have a special set of landing legs; to be designed to land on an uneven surface like the moon.
 
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JacobCooper45

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Apr 12, 2021
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I'm so glad and so excited after SN15 successful landing that I can't describe my feelings and emotions. That's the moment all space concerned people have been waiting for so long. I also heard that Elon may relaunch this prototype once again. What do you think: is it a good idea or not?
 
R

[)roi(]

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I'm so glad and so excited after SN15 successful landing that I can't describe my feelings and emotions. That's the moment all space concerned people have been waiting for so long. I also heard that Elon may relaunch this prototype once again. What do you think: is it a good idea or not?
They've decided not to relaunch SN15 as it would cause delays to other work on site; SN15 will now be installed as a monument at StarBase.
 
R

[)roi(]

Guest
Update on Spacex's rapid construction processes at StarBase incl. preparation for the first orbital flight of Starship.
Also an update on Starlink and the Virgin Galactic Flight.
 
R

[)roi(]

Guest
CRS-22 Mission
Amazing footage of the 1st stage landing with a camera on the 1st stage looking down; including also the speed and altitude of the 1st stage
-- helps puts into perspective the entry burn, the deceleration burn, and then the landing burn.


Highlights of the mission:
Includes e.g. New solar panels to increase the energy available for research and other onboard activities.
 
R

[)roi(]

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SpaceX is building a Starship raptor engine at a rate of one every 48 hours

Super heavy boosters will initially have 29 rapture engines and could in future be upgraded to 32 engines. Starship will use three sea‑level optimised Raptor engines and three vacuum optimised Raptor engines. The sea‑level engines are identical to the engines on the Super Heavy booster.
 

biometrics

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Oct 17, 2019
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Yet another billionaire entrepreneur is set to ride into space this week, strapped inside the capsule of a SpaceX rocket ship, as part of an astro-tourist team poised to make history as the first all-civilian crew launched into Earth orbit.

Jared Isaacman, the American founder and CEO of e-commerce firm Shift4 Payments, will lead three fellow spaceflight novices on a trip expected to last three days from blastoff at Cape Canaveral, Florida, to splashdown in the Atlantic.

The 38-year-old tech mogul has plunked down an unspecified but presumably exorbitant sum to fellow billionaire and SpaceX owner Elon Musk to fly Isaacman and three specially selected travel mates into orbit aboard a SpaceX Crew Dragon capsule.

The crew vehicle is set for blastoff from Nasa’s Kennedy Space Center atop one of Musk’s reusable Falcon 9 rockets
The crew vehicle is set for blastoff from Nasa’s Kennedy Space Center atop one of Musk’s reusable Falcon 9 rockets, with a 24-hour targeted launch window that opens at 8pm EDT (2am South African time) on Wednesday (Thursday). That window will be narrowed, or possibly altered, a few days before, depending on weather.

 
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