Looking for jobs abroad, anyone have tips?

RedViking

Member
Joined
Nov 15, 2021
Messages
58
I can give you R5 tip?

I don't have a formal education. So hope can somehow start a registered business in NZ, and then let the business invite me over. Can that work?
 

newjourno

Active Member
Joined
Dec 26, 2020
Messages
330
Just stepping into this thread to offer my experience. Have you considered looking outside of journalism for work? Unfortunately that field is not doing great at all. If you have writing skills there is a lot of demand within business for people who can present content properly. Be it technical writing, UX writing, business proposals, CV writing, you name it. I have an English Lit background and ended up in IT as a tech writer. Once you're in the door and learn the business environment there's plenty of areas you can grow into. If you're completely married to journalism then of course my advice won't be for you.

Also... if you have a background in IT, it's also not difficult to find jobs abroad. I've done it a few times already, including working remotely for a US company while I was in SA.

I have tried things like copywriting in order niches on a freelance basis for international clients but landing firm full time opportunities which translates into location has proven to be difficult.

I did once get an interview a year ago before the recruiter pulled out.

But yes, I do agree that Journalism as an industry is a mess. I do definitely have a solid work reel as far as my work samples are concerned for my niche (sports Journalism) but if I had to leave my full time role now, there is a chance that I could be unemployed for a considerable amount of time.

This is the nature of the industry in SA with the shortage of jobs. I do know some of the key decision makers in the industry but I'm a fairly quiet guy so they are unlikely to arrange anything for me other than odd freelance jobs if I contact them.
 

newjourno

Active Member
Joined
Dec 26, 2020
Messages
330
I can give you R5 tip?

I don't have a formal education. So hope can somehow start a registered business in NZ, and then let the business invite me over. Can that work?

I'm not a high earner lol, I have a nett worth of less than 1 million which is petty cash as far as establishing a business even locally is concerned.
 

Johnatan56

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 22, 2020
Messages
1,116
Location
Vienna
I'm not a high earner lol, I have a nett worth of less than 1 million which is petty cash as far as establishing a business even locally is concerned.
That's kind of nonsense, you can start a business with a few hundred (I and two friends did that, we all have shares but only one left in that company, costs were CIPC, laptops we already had and two months of hosting bills. It's still earning a good R50k after taxes etc. but split 80:15:5, last bit for me, since he's last one doing most of the work, and other one that left moderately recently, all keep getting 75% of the income of clients we brought in to make it fair), all depends what you're doing.

Journalism starting a business doesn't really work, instead you're more contracting out/doing a story/bit and selling it a news agency or something along those lines.

Have another friend who passed away recently, he started off while living off the street, he did a lot of supply/demand type thing with knowing the right people to get others in contact with and took a bit off it, ended up climbing the ladder a bit and retired as a multi-millionaire.

The CTO/CEO of the company I work out now started off with a laptop and two phones, that's it, now they're worth hundreds of millions of rand each.

If you're trying to do a business with stock, requiring rent and stuff, sure, but all dependent. Online means you can try and avoid and do drop shipping (so get enough orders together). There are lots of different ways to try and get around capital issues, but the problem is everything is more and more now differentiating based on your capital to invest for marketing, stock on hand, etc.
 

newjourno

Active Member
Joined
Dec 26, 2020
Messages
330
Me too, twice.

You are selling your time and your brain, you have both already.

It is something to think about but I've honestly always seen myself as a good worker rather than an entrepreneur. The closest I've been to being an entrepreneur is doing freelance gigs (I've made decent money from it over the years) as a side-hustle.

I will think of starting a business. I will just have to look at a skill that I can market.
 

RedViking

Member
Joined
Nov 15, 2021
Messages
58
It is something to think about but I've honestly always seen myself as a good worker rather than an entrepreneur. The closest I've been to being an entrepreneur is doing freelance gigs (I've made decent money from it over the years) as a side-hustle.

I will think of starting a business. I will just have to look at a skill that I can market.
Or partner with someone. I don't think I am a good entrepreneur, but I try to connect with those who are.
 

newjourno

Active Member
Joined
Dec 26, 2020
Messages
330
Or partner with someone. I don't think I am a good entrepreneur, but I try to connect with those who are.

Yes, social networking skills are very very important.

Upon further research, I've noticed two things.

1) Some get offers abroad because they are brilliant at their field and headhunted or start a business. If they are working for a multinational, they may get transferred or they may be identified by a global talent identification programme. A lot of companies like Bloomberg recruit this way now to add diversity to their workforce. Others have citizenship which makes it far easier.

2) Others are fairly average at their job but just at the right place at the right time, i.e they know someone in a strategic position who can fix something for them. If they are young and from a well off background their Dad may be friends with the company CEO etc.

A lot of people that fall into this category simply don't reveal the actual reasons for them getting their jobs and it's understandable but it does seem like more get in this way than the first way.

Some people also have the natural ability to "fake it till you make it", their networking skills can make their skills look far more advanced than they actually are. I've seen this happen a lot of times in my field which is sports media. Most of the people at the top have excellent networking skills but upon further analysis of their actual work, some have very poor analytical skills and are clearly not doing their jobs on merit. These type of people are often weary of promoting youngsters in the case that they get exposed but you can find them in cricket, soccer and rugby media.
 

Düber

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 20, 2020
Messages
1,065
Yes, social networking skills are very very important.

Upon further research, I've noticed two things.

1) Some get offers abroad because they are brilliant at their field and headhunted or start a business. If they are working for a multinational, they may get transferred or they may be identified by a global talent identification programme. A lot of companies like Bloomberg recruit this way now to add diversity to their workforce. Others have citizenship which makes it far easier.

2) Others are fairly average at their job but just at the right place at the right time, i.e they know someone in a strategic position who can fix something for them. If they are young and from a well off background their Dad may be friends with the company CEO etc.

A lot of people that fall into this category simply don't reveal the actual reasons for them getting their jobs and it's understandable but it does seem like more get in this way than the first way.

Some people also have the natural ability to "fake it till you make it", their networking skills can make their skills look far more advanced than they actually are. I've seen this happen a lot of times in my field which is sports media. Most of the people at the top have excellent networking skills but upon further analysis of their actual work, some have very poor analytical skills and are clearly not doing their jobs on merit. These type of people are often weary of promoting youngsters in the case that they get exposed but you can find them in cricket, soccer and rugby media.
If I can be bold and direct.
You sound like a bright and ambitious person, but I think you are being too timid in your approach.

Nobody remembers Trevor the Viking that stayed at home because he was frightened of boats and sharp pointy things.
You say that you know some influential people in your industry. They are not lying in their beds at night thinking about how they can get @newjourno a job in Seattle, London,New York... earning a gazillion dollars a year.

You need to make sure that whenever they turn around either you, one of your articles or your name is in their faces. That is how you will be in the "right place at the right time."
You shouldn't pussyfoot around them either but let them know clearly what you are looking for and what you can do. Back this up with proper work, even if you do this for free in your off time on a blog, youtube or anywhere else.

You say that you have done some freelance work, cultivate that. It is not just going to fall in your inbox or lap. Ask for it. The more you write the more your name will be out there.

I get and know that some people are not entrepreneurs. If you recognize that in yourself then don't try and force it. Running a business with all its difficulties will turn you into a very unhappy person very quickly if you are not cut out for it.

In your industry being able to network and hear about things is key, if that is a weak point for you, focus and work on it.

Sadly all these things are not easy and requires effort and persistence. There is no magic bullet.
 

newjourno

Active Member
Joined
Dec 26, 2020
Messages
330
You need to make sure that whenever they turn around either you, one of your articles or your name is in their faces. That is how you will be in the "right place at the right time."
You shouldn't pussyfoot around them either but let them know clearly what you are looking for and what you can do. Back this up with proper work, even if you do this for free in your off time on a blog, youtube or anywhere else.

Your advice is much appreciated, thanks.

I've probably written to every major sports editor in the country and many abroad. The reply to message sent ratio is very low but it has not been totally negative as I did get freelance work from it and even got my internship by doing this (unfortunately it was an unsuccessful internship but such is life, some work others don't). One freelance client, I've been working with for three years.

I try to network extensively online. These days that it is arguably more important than networking in person especially with fewer job prospects.

I know this sounds like I'm self-pitying but I don't think I'm total to blame here. I do think that being in a bad industry has messed things up, the situation is so bad that I actually know an experienced member of the same industry with 20+ years of experience who had to leave the industry totally as he could not find work and had to go and become an English teacher in China. With 20-years of experience, he was on radio everyday and simply could not find work (I'm pretty sure he was well connected to key stakeholders in the industry).

I've considered leaving the industry in the past, it unfortunately is an old-boys club in SA. I am leaning towards doing it and was looking to go abroad for that reason as I've been advised by Saffas who got their lucky break that it's much better and they feel more appreciated for the line of work.

I'll continue to send my CV around and just hope for that bit of luck. I have had a couple of interviews in the past year but none successful (in some cases it may have been me and in other cases, the employer probably already knew who they were employing and so interviewed me just for the requirements). That type of thing is rife in the industry.

Journalism is a dead-end industry right now so I've tried to also open myself up to communications, media officiating roles etc. Unfortunately, it's just a dark time and everything seems hard to get but I do think it may one day improve. As demotivated as I can get, I do sometimes get emails now and then which give me a glimmer of hope. I do also know that the situation can quickly change.
 

RedViking

Member
Joined
Nov 15, 2021
Messages
58
Your advice is much appreciated, thanks.

I've probably written to every major sports editor in the country and many abroad. The reply to message sent ratio is very low but it has not been totally negative as I did get freelance work from it and even got my internship by doing this (unfortunately it was an unsuccessful internship but such is life, some work others don't). One freelance client, I've been working with for three years.

I try to network extensively online. These days that it is arguably more important than networking in person especially with fewer job prospects.

I know this sounds like I'm self-pitying but I don't think I'm total to blame here. I do think that being in a bad industry has messed things up, the situation is so bad that I actually know an experienced member of the same industry with 20+ years of experience who had to leave the industry totally as he could not find work and had to go and become an English teacher in China. With 20-years of experience, he was on radio everyday and simply could not find work (I'm pretty sure he was well connected to key stakeholders in the industry).

I've considered leaving the industry in the past, it unfortunately is an old-boys club in SA. I am leaning towards doing it and was looking to go abroad for that reason as I've been advised by Saffas who got their lucky break that it's much better and they feel more appreciated for the line of work.

I'll continue to send my CV around and just hope for that bit of luck. I have had a couple of interviews in the past year but none successful (in some cases it may have been me and in other cases, the employer probably already knew who they were employing and so interviewed me just for the requirements). That type of thing is rife in the industry.

Journalism is a dead-end industry right now so I've tried to also open myself up to communications, media officiating roles etc. Unfortunately, it's just a dark time and everything seems hard to get but I do think it may one day improve. As demotivated as I can get, I do sometimes get emails now and then which give me a glimmer of hope. I do also know that the situation can quickly change.
Have you maybe considered doing/learning something completely different in your free time?

Before I knew is was going to start a new business venture doing architectural consulting, I started studying business and a little bit of accounting. It wasn't something I loved, but wanted to try something completely different, and if architecture wasn't going to work out, it would give me something else to consider or continue studying.

Now that I am part of a new business it turned out to be very valuable in making good financial decisions and drawing up a business plan etc.

The point I am making is you might be a journalist now, but you can, just as an example, study some coding, and later you can create a journalist application that automatically scrape articles across the globe and see how they link up with each other, a tool that other journalist can use to quickly jump on related events by paying a monthly fee. Coding might not be your dream, but it might be the step towards something new combined with your other experience.
 

newjourno

Active Member
Joined
Dec 26, 2020
Messages
330
Now that I am part of a new business it turned out to be very valuable in making good financial decisions and drawing up a business plan etc.

The point I am making is you might be a journalist now, but you can, just as an example, study some coding, and later you can create a journalist application that automatically scrape articles across the globe and see how they link up with each other, a tool that other journalist can use to quickly jump on related events by paying a monthly fee. Coding might not be your dream, but it might be the step towards something new combined with your other experience.

I'm 26 now and not getting any younger so now is probably the last chance I can get to make a career change. I apply for scholarship opportunities to study abroad and got one, turned it down because it was in a third-world country and I would have had to take a massive salary cut to take it. The stipend was 4k which is enough to live a comfortable life there but I weighed up the pros and cons and thought that the degree is unlikely to be valued and since they didn't want to let me do the research topic of my choice, the cons probably outweigh the pros.

I try and boost my skills on software and apps now and then but I prioritize because something like Photoshop takes a long time to learn and if you not at it everyday, you tend to forget.

But yeah, I like doing freelance instead and I've delved into content writing for casinos, betting reports, ghostwriting and writing PR releases for a British podcaster with a sizable following.
 
Top