Brexit

Paul Hjul

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Brexit has been the second most idiotic thing the UK has done in 500 years. Allowing Australia into the commonwealth is close to being surpassed.

This was all foreseeable in 2016 but politicians lied and the British electorate is as stupid as ours. I honestly battle to have any sympathy.

The end outcome is likely to be 5 or 10 years time the next generation of UK electorate will drag the country back into the EU but on worse terms than they had 5 years ago.

In email comms with a colleague in the UK that was considering being in Jhb around Nov:
I presume you guys won't be visiting Jhb around AfricaCom time at this stage as between our respective governments both countries aren't assured to have petrol, electricity and rational covid quaranteen rules being available concurrently in both countries.
 

Dave

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It’s a funny situation at present, of the supermarkets Sainsbury’s seem to be worst affected followed by Tesco. Weirdly Asda and Aldi seem to be operating almost as normal with no shortages, I suspect because they have their own distribution fleets while the others rely on external trucking companies.
 

Paul Hjul

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It’s a funny situation at present, of the supermarkets Sainsbury’s seem to be worst affected followed by Tesco. Weirdly Asda and Aldi seem to be operating almost as normal with no shortages, I suspect because they have their own distribution fleets while the others rely on external trucking companies.
Aren't Asda and Aldi German, whilst Tesco and Sainsbury's are British?

Just seems that European companies and pro-Euro organizations are better prepared for the continuous inevitable series of Brexit caused or aggregated cluster fucks that are going to happen.
 

Dave

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Aren't Asda and Aldi German, whilst Tesco and Sainsbury's are British?

All are actually British in the way you mean (all are fully British subsidiaries and have in-country warehousing and distribution), but parent wise Asda is part of Walmart so American and Aldi is German owned (even though it's a truly multinational company stretching from the USA through Europe and into China and Australia).

Of the four Aldi is probably the biggest champion of British produce.


In my opinion the biggest issue is that Asda and Aldi run their own delivery fleets while Tesco and Sainsburys rely on external companies (and are more exposed to driver shortages).
 

AdrianH

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All are actually British in the way you mean (all are fully British subsidiaries and have in-country warehousing and distribution), but parent wise Asda is part of Walmart so American and Aldi is German owned (even though it's a truly multinational company stretching from the USA through Europe and into China and Australia).

Walmart sold earlier this year to TDR Capital and ISSA brothers giving majority stake back to British owners


Sent from my CPH2127 using Tapatalk
 

Paul Hjul

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All are actually British in the way you mean (all are fully British subsidiaries and have in-country warehousing and distribution), but parent wise Asda is part of Walmart so American and Aldi is German owned (even though it's a truly multinational company stretching from the USA through Europe and into China and Australia).

Of the four Aldi is probably the biggest champion of British produce.


In my opinion the biggest issue is that Asda and Aldi run their own delivery fleets while Tesco and Sainsburys rely on external companies (and are more exposed to driver shortages).
ah confused Asda with Lidl
those bloody europeans all look alike
Come to think of it I don't think I've ever been in an Asda store, most food shopping Ive done in London has probably been at Waitrose

Pretty sure you are right about the delivery fleet issue
being somewhat faceteous but I am also strongly inclined to suspect that a lot of pro-Brexit and England first type companies that love their Eastern European labour force are going to be in the soup.

No reason you can't be pro-Euro and in favor of British produce. I mean nobody makes pork pies better.
 

Johnatan56

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Nothing of that has to do with what they did in regards to quarantine...
Also no mask mandates indoors for a lot of the stuff, if I need to get on a plane two weeks later, not going to want to test positive.
Lee agrees. "We [in China] wear masks, so maybe we wouldn't feel safe seeing no one wearing a mask. Maybe we wouldn't want to take the Tube." While the mask mandate has been removed by government, one has been imposed on London transport by mayor Sadiq Khan -- yet Londoners say it is often ignored, and rarely enforced.
And then:
Since October 1, EU citizens can no longer travel to the UK on their ID cards; instead, they must use passports.
"That's enormously important," says Tom Jenkins, who says that around three quarters of Europeans don't have passports, since they can travel around Europe with their ID cards.
That means ~115 EUR pp for a trip, rather just go to Spain, Italy, France, etc.
And if it's for English, Ireland is right next door.

It was a stupid move.
Richard Hughes said leaving the EU would reduce the UK's potential GDP by about 4% in the long term.
He said forecasts showed the pandemic would reduce GDP "by a further 2%".
"In the long term it is the case that Brexit has a bigger impact than the pandemic", he told the BBC.
And that's a 4% contraction, not impact on future growth.
 

Dave

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That means ~115 EUR pp for a trip, rather just go to Spain, Italy, France, etc. And if it's for English, Ireland is right next door.

Just to clarify a point, Irish citizens can still travel to the UK on their ID card.

 

Dave

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We had another Brexit bonus announced today, Visa has decided that as the UK doesn't have to be treated as EU and is increasing merchant fees way above the EU mandated cap. To such an extent that Amazon UK has announced it won't be accepting Visa Credit cards anymore.

69983CB2-E02D-49DD-B7E3-3180A40D2A2A.jpeg

I presume it's a pressure tactic to force the charge down, so we'll see what happens.
 

biometrics

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We had another Brexit bonus announced today, Visa has decided that as the UK doesn't have to be treated as EU and is increasing merchant fees way above the EU mandated cap. To such an extent that Amazon UK has announced it won't be accepting Visa Credit cards anymore.

View attachment 30039

I presume it's a pressure tactic to force the charge down, so we'll see what happens.
Amazon is offering customers 20 pounds to change from Visa as they default payment card. Quite a bit of money...
 
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